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Winter Wellness

Seasonal
Flu Vaccine
Now Available

All Manitobans over 6 months of age are eligible for the seasonal flu shot. It’s especially recommended for those at increased risk of serious illness from the flu, their caregivers and close contacts.

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Sign up for our e-newsletter with information about the province’s COVID-19, influenza, and youth immunization programs.

2 Million Doses And Counting

Manitoba is two million doses strong! Together, we’ve reached a major milestone in the largest vaccination campaign in Manitoba’s history. Thank you to everyone for doing your part to protect Manitoba. If you still need to get your COVID-19 vaccine, find a clinic near you.

Vaccine Finder

Looking for a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose? Use the Booster Dose interactive map on the ProtectMB.ca/Booster page.

Find an immunization site with this easy-to-use interactive map. Make sure to click what type of vaccine you’re looking for. When you find the location that’s right for you, click on the icon on the map for more information, including how to book your appointment.

Super-Sites: Larger immunization sites. You can request interpreter services, or ASL services, at super-sites. Take a tour of the RBC Convention Centre super-site.

Urban Indigenous Clinics: Offered in partnership, these clinics provide cultural support to people who might otherwise face barriers accessing immunization. When possible, child minding will be offered to support parents. An Elder or traditional Knowledge Keeper will be at the sites regularly. Traditional ceremony, smudging, and traditional medicines may also be offered.

Pop-Up Clinics: Only open on certain days, make sure to check the map for details on how to book an appointment. 

Medical Clinics and Pharmacies: More information about which vaccines are available and how to make your appointment are listed for each location.

Influenza Vaccine

Covid-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Vaccine for Youth & Kids

The vaccine helps protect young people against the virus, and helps to reduce the spread to their families, friends and within the community. Vaccinating youth will also help us continue in-person learning at school, and it will help kids get back to sports, music and all of the other activities that they love. Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine for youth age 12 to 17, and the pediatric vaccine for kids age 5 to 11. 

Manitoba’s Vaccine Milestones

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Pre 1910

Immunization record booklet

1798 Edward Jenner’s demonstration that inoculation with cowpox could protect against smallpox brought the first hope that the disease could be controlled.

1881 Rubella was accepted as a distinct disease by the International Congress of Medicine.

1885 Dr. Alexander Stewart of Palmerston, Ontario founded a vaccine farm; his cows provided a dependable smallpox vaccine supply for 31 years. In 1916, Connaught Laboratories took over the manufacture of sterile vaccine for uniform, enduring potency.

1888 Tetanus is discovered.

1906 Pertussis bacterium is discovered.

1910 to 1939

1918 First Canadian pertussis vaccine

girl in wheelchair with polio

1918-1919 “Spanish Flu” influenza pandemic

1924 9,000 cases of diphtheria were reported in Canada; it was one of the most common causes of death of children from 1 to 5 years of age.

1926 Diphtheria toxoid is introduced.

1920s to 1930s 40 to 50 deaths from tetanus were reported annually.

1933 Mumps virus is isolated.

(Photo source: CDC Public Health Image Library ID#8283)

1940 to 1959

polio-stricken children

1940 Tetanus toxoid is introduced in Canada.

1943 Routine immunization against pertussis (whooping cough) is approved in Canada.

1953 9,000 cases of polio were reported; 12 years later, after the introduction of polio vaccine, only 3 cases were reported.

1954 Measles virus is isolated.

1955 The Salk polio vaccine is licensed in North America.

1960s

1962 Trivalent oral polio vaccine is licensed in Canada.

Getting vaccinated

1962 Rubella virus is isolated.

1963 The first measles vaccine is approved. Prior to immunization, an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 cases occurred annually.

1964 The National Advisory Committee on Immunizing Agents (now the National Advisory Committee on Immunization or NACI) was formed.

1968 No cases of wild polio virus were reported in Canada.

1969 Rubella vaccine introduced in Canada; incidence of rubella decreased by 60,000 cases per year.

1970s

Boy with smallpox getting vaccinated

1972 Routine smallpox vaccination stopped.

1977 The last indigenous case of smallpox occurs in Somalia.

1980s

1980 The global eradication of smallpox is certified by a commission of eminent scientists and endorsed by the World Health Assembly.

Getting vaccinated

1982 Hepatitis B vaccine available in Canada; school-based programs began in 1987. At its peak prior to widespread immunization, there were 3,000 cases per year; in 2004 there were 829 cases.

1983 MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) immunization program introduced for all infants. Rubella cases went from approximately 5,300 per year between 1971 and 1982 to fewer than 30 cases per year between 1988 and 1994.

1983 Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is approved for use in Canada.

1988 Hib (Haemophilus influenzae) vaccine introduced in Canada. Prior to routine immunization, there were 526 cases per year in children under 5; in 2004, there were 17 cases in this age group.

1990s

1992 Introduction of Hib vaccine in Canada. Before the vaccine, over 400 children with Hib infections were admitted to hospital annually. Four years after introduction of the vaccine, 8 cases per year.

Getting vaccinated

1994 Canada is certified polio-free.

1995 Canada switches from live oral polio vaccine (OPV) to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to avoid further cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP).

1996-7 Two-dose MMR immunization is introduced.

1997-8 Acellular pertussis vaccine replaces whole-cell inactivated vaccine. Pertussis (whooping cough) outbreaks continue to occur in some communities with low vaccination rates.

1999 Varicella (chickenpox) vaccine is available in Canada.

2000s

2001 Meningococcal vaccine against group C strains approved for use in Canada; made available in all provinces as part of routine infant immunization since 2005.

Getting vaccinated

2004 The inactivated influenza vaccine is recommended for all children 6-23 months of age.

2006 First HPV vaccine is approved for use in Canada to reduce the risk that women will develop cervical cancer.

2006 New meningococcal vaccine with broader coverage against groups A, C and W135 approved for use in Canada.

2006 Live oral rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV) vaccine is approved for use in infants 6 to 32 weeks of age in Canada.

2008 Herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine is approved for use in Canada.

Our Stories

Renata Meconse with daughter Ava, age 10

Renata Meconse with daughter Ava, age 10

During the initial vaccine rollout in early 2021, Ava asked, “When will kids be able to get their vaccine?”

We cautiously went through 2021 waiting for Ava to be eligible for her vaccination. That day came later in November 2021. Before getting her shot, Ava and I read the fact sheet about children and vaccines. We talked about it and planned what we would do that day. She normally feels apprehensive about needles, so we talked about that, too. We talked about how she had gotten needles before for blood tests and other vaccines. We also talked about why this vaccine is important and her choice in getting it.

The day of her vaccination, we made sure Ava wore a short-sleeved shirt. As expected, she was still a little nervous about the needle itself. I held her hand and she felt better with me being beside her. Before we knew it, the doctor had given her the vaccine and she was done! Afterwards, we went for ice cream. She stayed home for the rest of the day and we monitored her. She felt a slight soreness in her arm that evening but by the next day she was fine.

For Ava, she didn’t only want to protect herself, she said she wanted “To protect Grannie.” We live in a multigenerational household and my mom, who turns 81 this year, was getting out of the hospital in late December. It was great that we could get our entire household vaccinated before she got home.

I’m so glad we did get vaccinated as COVID did hit our household. My family members who tested positive with rapid tests isolated while they awaited their PCR tests and we all did our best to minimize interactions with each other. They were isolated in their rooms. I brought food and other things they needed to minimize in-person contact. We sanitized the washroom after each use, washed hands frequently, wore masks and did everything to keep a distance from each other. I am thankful to share that the members of my household who tested positive (and were fully vaccinated) got through COVID without serious symptoms or hospitalization. Also, I am very thankful that Ava and I did not get the virus. Knowing that Omicron spreads very easily and quickly, we are glad to have had the vaccines to help protect us.

As we move into 2022, with the Omicron variant spreading, I feel safer knowing that our family is vaccinated. Ava will soon be getting her second shot and other children her age will also be getting theirs. We look forward to doing more things with other people as the weather gets warmer. And once it’s safer, we’d like to travel and go to gatherings. Ava loves to dance at powwows and I love to watch her. Last summer, Ava was able to dance, but a lot of powwows were cancelled or limited in size. We look forward to that time when our communities can gather, see each other in person, hug, laugh, and kids can play together and dance. 

When Ava was vaccinated, it was an opportunity for her peers to talk about what it felt like. I encourage young people to talk to their friends and peers about getting vaccinated. As we go through this pandemic, we need to talk to each other, encourage and support one another. 

We were so glad when Ava’s question was finally answered—now is the time for kids to have their turn at getting vaccinated.

Even though COVID-19 hit our household, we were able to fight it and everyone was able to overcome it. Thinking about all of our generations and how we need to protect one another, I encourage youth and young adults to get vaccinated. There are vaccine clinics you can go to get your vaccine done quickly and in friendly environments. You can also go to pharmacies or your doctor’s office. 

If you have questions before deciding, read from credible sources and ask at the vaccine clinic. Get immunized to protect your siblings, cousins and little ones who are too young to be vaccinated. 

Be a role model for your friends in following health measures that can protect our grandparents, parents, aunties and uncles. If someone in your family hasn’t been vaccinated, support and encourage them to get theirs, go together. We all have a role to play in protecting our family, our community and each other.

Be kind and take care of each other ♥  

During the initial vaccine rollout in early 2021, Ava asked, “When will kids be able to get their vaccine?” We cautiously went through 2021 waiting for Ava to be eligible for her vaccination. That day came later in November 2021. Before getting her shot, Ava and I read the fact sheet about children and vaccines. […]

Scott & Abigail Larson with daughter Nala, age 6

Scott & Abigail Larson with daughter Nala, age 6

We chose to vaccinate our daughter Nala, who is 6 years old, to keep her safe but also because we have new babies, elderly and at-risk people in our extended families. While we weren’t too anxious about the risk of Nala herself ending up in the ICU, the bigger issue was reducing transmission to those who might get severely ill. We read the report from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization and we clearly understood that there are very low risks associated with giving the COVID vaccine to kids.

Scott & Abigail Larson with daughter Nala, age 6

When Nala got her first vaccine dose she was thinking about PJ Masks because it was a prize at the immunization clinic. About the experience with the needle, she said, “It didn’t hurt. I thought the needle would be big and sharp. It wasn’t really sharp, but it had to be a little sharp to get into my skin.” Nala didn’t have side effects and went to her regular gymnastics and swimming classes two days later.

Nala looked forward to showing off that she got the shot because she was the first in her class to get vaccinated. We filmed Nala getting her shot and shared the video with family so the other cousins her age would see that it wasn’t such a bad experience. After all, if little Nala can do it, so can they! 

We have four children in school. Our 16-year-old is at-risk of COVID symptoms due to her asthma. She feels safer now that Nala and her 11-year-old brother have had their first vaccine dose. Our kids have been good, ensuring everyone in the family is following the public health rules. This year we’ve gotten fewer letters home from school about COVID exposures, fewer direct contacts with COVID cases, and haven’t had to get tested as often. We believe it makes a difference that teachers are vaccinated and that parents are keeping their kids home if they’re sick. 

Abigail works as a midwife in a hospital and has seen nurses from her department being moved to the ICU. We know there is a huge burden on the health system, and there needs to be space left in the hospital for those who are immuno-compromised and experience severe COVID symptoms. Now that kids age 5 to 11 are eligible to be vaccinated we think they should be. We completely understand why people might be anxious or stressed about it, but we would encourage parents to think about the greater good. 

Scott & Abigail Larson with daughter Nala, age 6

We chose to vaccinate our daughter Nala, who is 6 years old, to keep her safe but also because we have new babies, elderly and at-risk people in our extended families. While we weren’t too anxious about the risk of Nala herself ending up in the ICU, the bigger issue was reducing transmission to those […]

Carlo and Heidi Cecilio with daughter Zooey, age 8

Carlo and Heidi Cecilio with daughter Zooey, age 8

We’re from the Philippines and we arrived in Winnipeg in February 2021. When we came to Canada, Zooey, our 8-year old daughter, had to go through a swab test for COVID-19 and catch up on other immunization shots. Because of all of that she was a little more experienced with what to expect when getting her COVID-19 vaccine. Before that, she would cry or do evasive moves to avoid the needle. 

When we took Zooey for her first COVID-19 vaccine dose, we were so proud of her bravery. She said, “It hurts a little, but it’s okay.” It was nice to be able to distract her with cookies which took her mind off the needle.

One of the main reasons we wanted Zooey to get vaccinated is because we’ve lost family and friends to COVID-19, including Zooey’s uncle and godfather. We don’t want Zooey or anyone else in our family to go through a loss like that. It’s been a tough year. 

Initially, when the COVID-19 vaccines first came out we worried about its safety and if it would work. After reading more information about the vaccines, we felt we could trust the science and Health Canada, and didn’t worry about it anymore. 

Zooey didn’t have any side effects from her first COVID vaccine dose. We monitored her the first night and kept putting a hand on her forehead to check her temperature, but she was just acting like a normal kid—busy playing! There was no redness or soreness on her arm either.

I know COVID has had a big impact in Canada, but I think it’s worse in the Philippines. We don’t post photos on social media of Zooey on playgrounds or playing in the snow—not because we don’t want to, but because we know our friends in Manila have to keep their kids home a lot because of COVID. Their kids don’t go out as much there as they do here.

The first time Zooey was invited to a playdate in Winnipeg, we said no. We were wondering, are the parents vaccinated? Have they been exposed to COVID-19? After her first shot, we’ll feel more confident if she goes on a playdate, and we’ll feel even better when she gets her second shot. We plan to go to movie theatres and eat in a mall food court. Zooey is looking forward to being able to remove her mask more often, because it can get in the way when she’s playing.

We’re both photographers and we love to travel. Zooey is starting to make her own journal, take videos and photos. We look forward to getting to know Winnipeg and Manitoba. The COVID vaccine will give us more confidence to explore more of Canada.

We’re from the Philippines and we arrived in Winnipeg in February 2021. When we came to Canada, Zooey, our 8-year old daughter, had to go through a swab test for COVID-19 and catch up on other immunization shots. Because of all of that she was a little more experienced with what to expect when getting […]

Be Informed

Protecting our community works best when we all do our part.