Other Vaccines

Other Vaccines

Most vaccines in Manitoba are free of charge, including the routine vaccines administered for children and youth. Some adult vaccines that are recommended based on certain criteria are also free of charge. However, some vaccines that are recommended for travel to certain countries, may include a fee.

Travel

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Travel

Travel health and tropical medicine services are run through the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. The program goals are to promote positive travel experiences while reducing the chance of getting and spreading communicable diseases such as hepatitis, meningitis, etc. By managing tropical and travel-related illness through education, immunization, and treatment, we protect travellers and all Manitobans.

Travel health includes a full range of services:

  • Pre-travel health services: risk assessment, vaccine and documentation 
  • Post-travel health services: follow up for non-urgent travel related illnesses 
  • Yellow fever vaccination

Also, Rabies Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Immunization is available for at-risk individuals through Travel Health. 

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Visit the travel health and tropical medicine services web site for more information.

Tetanus

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Tetanus

Tetanus is a disease commonly referred to as “lockjaw.” The word lockjaw comes from the familiar symptom associated with tetanus – stiffness of the neck and jaw. Tetanus spores can live in dirt, dust and manure. They can get into the body through a cut, puncture wound or burn and cause infection. If people become infected with tetanus, they can have very serious illness.

Tetanus can be prevented through immunization. Manitoba has a provincial immunization program, which provides free, publicly-funded vaccines to those are eligible.

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Find out who is eligible for a tetanus vaccine.

HPV

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HPV

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is estimated to be one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Canada and around the world. Most people who are sexually active will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime. People in their late teens or early 20s are the age groups most commonly infected with HPV.

The most common high-risk types of HPV can be prevented through immunization. Manitoba has a provincial immunization program. It provides free, publicly-funded HPV vaccine to those who are eligible.

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Find out who is eligible for an HPV vaccine.

Manitoba’s Vaccine Milestones

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Pre 1910

Immunization record booklet

1798 Edward Jenner’s demonstration that inoculation with cowpox could protect against smallpox brought the first hope that the disease could be controlled.

1881 Rubella was accepted as a distinct disease by the International Congress of Medicine.

1885 Dr. Alexander Stewart of Palmerston, Ontario founded a vaccine farm; his cows provided a dependable smallpox vaccine supply for 31 years. In 1916, Connaught Laboratories took over the manufacture of sterile vaccine for uniform, enduring potency.

1888 Tetanus is discovered.

1906 Pertussis bacterium is discovered.

1910 to 1939

1918 First Canadian pertussis vaccine

girl in wheelchair with polio

1918-1919 “Spanish Flu” influenza pandemic

1924 9,000 cases of diphtheria were reported in Canada; it was one of the most common causes of death of children from 1 to 5 years of age.

1926 Diphtheria toxoid is introduced.

1920s to 1930s 40 to 50 deaths from tetanus were reported annually.

1933 Mumps virus is isolated.

(Photo source: CDC Public Health Image Library ID#8283)

1940 to 1959

polio-stricken children

1940 Tetanus toxoid is introduced in Canada.

1943 Routine immunization against pertussis (whooping cough) is approved in Canada.

1953 9,000 cases of polio were reported; 12 years later, after the introduction of polio vaccine, only 3 cases were reported.

1954 Measles virus is isolated.

1955 The Salk polio vaccine is licensed in North America.

1960s

1962 Trivalent oral polio vaccine is licensed in Canada.

Getting vaccinated

1962 Rubella virus is isolated.

1963 The first measles vaccine is approved. Prior to immunization, an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 cases occurred annually.

1964 The National Advisory Committee on Immunizing Agents (now the National Advisory Committee on Immunization or NACI) was formed.

1968 No cases of wild polio virus were reported in Canada.

1969 Rubella vaccine introduced in Canada; incidence of rubella decreased by 60,000 cases per year.

1970s

Boy with smallpox getting vaccinated

1972 Routine smallpox vaccination stopped.

1977 The last indigenous case of smallpox occurs in Somalia.

1980s

1980 The global eradication of smallpox is certified by a commission of eminent scientists and endorsed by the World Health Assembly.

Getting vaccinated

1982 Hepatitis B vaccine available in Canada; school-based programs began in 1987. At its peak prior to widespread immunization, there were 3,000 cases per year; in 2004 there were 829 cases.

1983 MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) immunization program introduced for all infants. Rubella cases went from approximately 5,300 per year between 1971 and 1982 to fewer than 30 cases per year between 1988 and 1994.

1983 Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is approved for use in Canada.

1988 Hib (Haemophilus influenzae) vaccine introduced in Canada. Prior to routine immunization, there were 526 cases per year in children under 5; in 2004, there were 17 cases in this age group.

1990s

1992 Introduction of Hib vaccine in Canada. Before the vaccine, over 400 children with Hib infections were admitted to hospital annually. Four years after introduction of the vaccine, 8 cases per year.

Getting vaccinated

1994 Canada is certified polio-free.

1995 Canada switches from live oral polio vaccine (OPV) to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to avoid further cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP).

1996-7 Two-dose MMR immunization is introduced.

1997-8 Acellular pertussis vaccine replaces whole-cell inactivated vaccine. Pertussis (whooping cough) outbreaks continue to occur in some communities with low vaccination rates.

1999 Varicella (chickenpox) vaccine is available in Canada.

2000s

2001 Meningococcal vaccine against group C strains approved for use in Canada; made available in all provinces as part of routine infant immunization since 2005.

Getting vaccinated

2004 The inactivated influenza vaccine is recommended for all children 6-23 months of age.

2006 First HPV vaccine is approved for use in Canada to reduce the risk that women will develop cervical cancer.

2006 New meningococcal vaccine with broader coverage against groups A, C and W135 approved for use in Canada.

2006 Live oral rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV) vaccine is approved for use in infants 6 to 32 weeks of age in Canada.

2008 Herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine is approved for use in Canada.

Our Stories

Dr. Jared Bullard, Pediatrician, Children’s Hospital and son

Dr Jared Bullard, Children’s Hospital Pediatrician & Dad

Now that Health Canada has approved the COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11, my own child Donovan, who just turned 11, finally received his first dose! Donovan, like a lot of kids I see, is scared of needles. Unlike other routine vaccines, Donovan has seen his sister, his aunts and uncles, grandparents and parents get vaccinated. So, in this case, he sees the vaccine as an opportunity to take his turn and do his part.

What to Expect

I assured Donovan that with the COVID-19 vaccine, he would probably feel a pinch or a squeeze with the needle but that overall this vaccine is not too bad compared with other vaccines. Some kids actually ask “You’re done?” or “You did it already?” because they really didn’t feel the pinch of the needle. Parents who got the COVID vaccine themselves will know from experience that the needle itself isn’t very painful. While this can be reassuring, it likely won’t entirely diminish a child’s anxiety.

Prepare Ahead of Time

Parents know their child best, but in general I suggest you give your child a day or two notice ahead of the vaccine appointment. Talk with them about what the vaccine is for and let them ask you questions. Also, prepare ahead of time and be ready to distract your child while the vaccine is being administered, often pediatricians will ask your child questions to take their attention elsewhere, but parents know best what works for their kid. If a video game on your phone is effective, do what works! If you plan to make the day special with a special treat or activity, talk about that during the appointment to take their attention away from whatever is worrying them.

Ask For Help

If a child is especially anxious about needle pain, your pediatrician or family doctor can prescribe a numbing cream which is applied to the upper arm at the injection site half an hour or so before the appointment. This can be psychologically reassuring for children, knowing there is a plan to reduce discomfort.

Side Effects

The vaccine is safe. Based on studies done, we’re seeing that the side effects like fever and headaches are less likely for children, while redness at the injection site is more likely. You’ll still want to plan low key activities following your appointment.

For the Hesitant Parent

We know that many parents are eager to get their children protected from COVID, while others have a wait and see approach. All parents want what is best for their children, and if you have questions, make sure to talk to your pediatrician or doctor who can help you assess the risk. If your child has other medical conditions that lower their immunity, if they have neurological differences, or are obese, the chances are greater that catching COVID would result in more severe disease symptoms.

Canada has the benefit of seeing real world examples of the vaccine’s effectiveness in children. Over a million children ages 5 to 11 in the United States have already been vaccinated. In Canada, we’ve had over 2 million children aged 12 to 17 who have been immunized to COVID as well. There are some important, although rare, safety concerns for 12-17 year olds, such as myocarditis. So far, the evidence is showing that those symptoms are mild and resolve fully. I would encourage those who want to wait, that they create a criteria for themselves, whether it’s a time frame, or by number of children who have been vaccinated, and commit to revisiting their concerns with their doctor.

I would encourage those who want to wait, to create a criteria for themselves, whether it’s a time frame, or by number of children who have been vaccinated, and commit to revisiting their concerns with their doctor.

Plan Your Appointment

We’re so fortunate now to be able to get the COVID vaccine in a variety of places including doctors offices, pharmacies, clinics and schools. In talking with Donovan, I asked him what he’s most looking forward to once he is fully vaccinated. He says he wants to be able to visit restaurants with his friends, and get back to playing hockey! I imagine all of our kids are waiting to get back to more normal routines. I encourage parents to book their appointment as soon as they can.

Now that Health Canada has approved the COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11, my own child Donovan, who just turned 11, finally received his first dose! Donovan, like a lot of kids I see, is scared of needles. Unlike other routine vaccines, Donovan has seen his sister, his aunts and uncles, grandparents and […]

Aubrey Trenholm

Aubrey Trenholm

I was very surprised and happy that I won the $25,000 scholarship. I’m looking to pursue architecture or engineering and the scholarship is going to be very helpful.

I decided to get vaccinated because the faster everybody gets vaccinated, the faster everything is going to go back to normal. Because I am vaccinated, I can go to Jets games and to the movies. The vaccine has really benefitted me because I feel safe in a public outdoor space without wearing a mask.

I was very surprised and happy that I won the $25,000 scholarship. I’m looking to pursue architecture or engineering and the scholarship is going to be very helpful. I decided to get vaccinated because the faster everybody gets vaccinated, the faster everything is going to go back to normal. Because I am vaccinated, I can […]

Lottery Winners

Kerry Maskiew, Vax to Win Lottery Winner

Southern Health-Santé Sud Health Authority Winner of the Vax to Win Lottery

The morning they called to tell me I won the Vax to Win Lottery, I woke up my wife: “Honey, we just won the lottery!” We hugged! We were so happy. We’ve been to hundreds of socials over the years, entered draws, and we’ve never won a prize until now.

In October 2020, my mother moved into Parkview Place, a personal care home that had experienced an outbreak of COVID-19 where people died. There was no vaccine at the time. We worked hard to move her elsewhere, and we’re so grateful she didn’t contract COVID. My wife is also a stroke survivor, so she’s susceptible—it wouldn’t be good if she got COVID.

So my decision to be immunized for COVID-19 was easy, because I knew I was protecting my mom and my wife. 

For our first dose, my wife and I had AstraZeneca administered at our doctor’s office in April. At first I felt general soreness, aches and pains, and then had a slight headache, but by day four I was back to normal. My second dose was Pfizer and I didn’t have any side-effects.

Kerry Maskiew, Vax to Win Lottery Winner

I work as an architectural specification writer with Stantec in Winnipeg. We have three adult children. We celebrated my lottery win with steak and lobsters with our child who lives locally. We’ll visit our other kids, who live in other parts of Canada, and go out for celebration dinners with all of them too. We’ll use the winnings to renovate our bathroom to make it more accessible for my wife.

I think vaccination is something we all should want to do to get our lives back to some semblance of normality. It’s terrible to think that you could be a carrier and infect somebody and cause them to die. I encourage all Manitobans to get the vaccine, and know that you won’t be needlessly propagating this disease.

Southern Health-Santé Sud Health Authority Winner of the Vax to Win Lottery The morning they called to tell me I won the Vax to Win Lottery, I woke up my wife: “Honey, we just won the lottery!” We hugged! We were so happy. We’ve been to hundreds of socials over the years, entered draws, and […]

Be Informed

Protecting our community works best when we all do our part.